Lawton

Draft 2035 Long Range Transportation Plan

Posted by Admin on 01/11/2013

 Lawton Metropolitan Planning Organization

   212 Southwest 9th Street                                                                 Lawton, OK 73501             

   Phone (580) 581-3375                                                                   Fax     (580) 581-3573

                                                                www.lawtonmpo.org

 

 DRAFT 

2035 LONG RANGE 

TRANSPORTATION PLAN

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

Chapter 1:  Introduction..................................................................................................................... 1

      Plan Preparation.......................................................................................................................... 1

      Study Area.................................................................................................................................. 2

      Transportation Committees

            Lawton Metropolitan Planning Organization............................................................................ 2

            Transportation Technical Committee...................................................................................... 2

            Transportation Policy Committee........................................................................................... 2

      Approval Process........................................................................................................................ 3

 

Chapter 2:  2030 LRTP vs. Current Data........................................................................................... 4

      Population and Employment......................................................................................................... 4

      Growth Patterns.......................................................................................................................... 4

      Street Improvements.................................................................................................................... 5

 

Chapter 3:  Transportation System..................................................................................................... 6

      Road System............................................................................................................................... 6

      Public Transportation................................................................................................................... 7

      Bicycle and Pedestrian ................................................................................................................ 7

      Safe Routes to School................................................................................................................. 8

      Airport ....................................................................................................................................... 8

      Railroad...................................................................................................................................... 8

      Freight  ....................................................................................................................................... 8

      Air Quality................................................................................................................................... 8

     

Chapter 4:  Goals and Objectives..................................................................................................... 11

 

Chapter 5:  Projects......................................................................................................................... 14

      No-Build Projects..................................................................................................................... 18

 

Chapter 6:  Funding......................................................................................................................... 19

      Funding Sources........................................................................................................................ 19

      Revenue.................................................................................................................................... 19

      Costs   ..................................................................................................................................... 20

 

Table 1.  Comparison of Population Data........................................................................................... 4

Table 2.  Comparison of Employment Data........................................................................................ 4

Table 3.  Air Quality Data................................................................................................................ 10

Table 4.  Projects............................................................................................................................ 15

Table 5.  Estimated Revenue for Implementation of Projects............................................................. 20

Table 6.  2035 LRTP Implementation Costs..................................................................................... 20

 

Map 1. LMATS Boundary.............................................................................................................. 21

Map 2.  LATS Bus Route................................................................................................................ 22

Map 3.  Bicycle and Pedestrian Plan Routes..................................................................................... 23

Map 4.  Location of Projects........................................................................................................... 24

 

Appendices

Appendix A – Acronyms

Appendix B – Committees

Chapter 1:  Introduction

The Long Range Transportation Plan (LRTP) anticipates transportation needs for the Lawton Metropolitan Area Transportation Study (LMATS) area based on demographic and economic assumptions and forecasts.  The Federal planning regulations require the long range transportation plan provide for a planning horizon of 20 years and be updated every five years.  The 2030 Long Range Transportation Plan for the Lawton Metropolitan Area Transportation Study (LMATS) area was adopted in January 2008.  The proposed 2035 LRTP extension will reaffirm the 2030 LRTP by readopting the vision, goals, and objectives and extending the planning horizon year to 2035.  

The 2030 LRTP included projections of the effects of the Base Realignment and Closure Act on Fort Sill and the City of Lawton. Data included in the 2030 LRTP has been reviewed and compared with the available 2010 Census data and projections for population and employment for the 20-year planning horizon.  The actual effect on the LMATS area was not as great as projected, and the projections in the 2030 LRTP are still valid.  Significant changes are discussed in this Plan   The proposed 2035 LRTP extension will ensure that a 20-year planning horizon is intact and that transportation planning and project implementation will continue without interruption.  The 2035 LRTP is a minor update of the LRTP which reevaluates the population and employment forecasts, accounting for transportation investments and policy changes since 2008, and recommending fiscally feasible improvements through 2035.    

In July 2013 work will begin on the full update of the LRTP.  The update will be completed by the end of December 2014 and will be adopted as the 2040 Long Range Transportation Plan. 

A new transportation bill, “Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act” (MAP-21), was signed into law on July 6, 2012 and became effective October 1, 2012.  MAP-21 authorizes federal transportation programs and funding through September 30, 2014.  The impacts and implications of pending policy changes and funding are not known at the time of adoption of this plan and therefore cannot be addressed.  MAP-21 guidelines will be addressed in the 2040 LRTP.   

All transportation plans and programs are based on a continuous, coordinated, and comprehensive planning process, conducted in cooperation with local and state government.  Acronyms (Appendix A) and memberships of committees (Appendix B) can be found at the end of the Plan. 

Plan Preparation

The LRTP anticipates transportation needs based on demographic and economic projections for the Lawton Metropolitan Area Transportation Study (LMATS) area.  The plan identifies transportation facilities such as major roadways, transit, airport, and bicycle and pedestrian routes. The LRTP includes goals, objectives, and analyses of area trends and planned improvement projects throughout the study area as well as a study of roadway, bicycle, pedestrian, and transit improvements to be incorporated within the study area.  Projects identified in the LRTP must be financially feasible; therefore, the LRTP includes implementation costs and resources.    

Federal regulations require the transportation plan provide for a planning horizon of 20 years and be updated not less than once every five years.  For federal funding eligibility, a transportation project must be included in the LRTP.  

This plan confirms current and forecasted transportation and land use conditions and trends as well as issues facing the study area concerning limited funding and policies/strategies as identified in the 2030 LRTP and extends the forecast period to the year 2035.   

Study Area

The LMATS area includes all of the city of Lawton (excluding Fort Sill) and portions of Comanche County, totaling 64.01 square miles.  Map 1 illustrates the LMATS boundary.  

Transportation Committees

There are three committees vital to the transportation planning process:  the Lawton Metropolitan Planning Organization, the Transportation Technical Committee, and the Transportation Policy Committee.  Appendix B lists the membership of each group. 

Lawton Metropolitan Planning Organization

Under the transportation bill Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act – A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU), any urbanized area (as defined by the Census Bureau) exceeding a population of 50,000 people must have an established Metropolitan Planning Organization.  In 2003, the Lawton City Planning Commission was designated as the Lawton Metropolitan Planning Organization by the Governor of Oklahoma. As the LMPO, it is tasked with the primary role and responsibility of ensuring that the transportation planning process is being carried out according to Federal and State regulations.  The planning and program management functions are administered and carried out by the City of Lawton’s Planning Division, which provides staff, technical and clerical support.  The City of Lawton Director of Planning is designated as the LMPO Secretary. 

Transportation Technical Committee

The Transportation Technical Committee (TTC) is an advisory committee to the LMPO and the Transportation Policy Committee.  Membership includes representatives from the City of Lawton, Lawton-Fort Sill Regional Airport, Fort Sill, Lawton Area Transit System, Lawton-Fort Sill Changer of Commerce and Industry, Association of South Central Oklahoma Governments, local tribes, Oklahoma Department of Transportation, Federal Highways Administration, and Federal Transit Administration. The TTC provides technical expertise related to review of transportation issues and development of proposed plans and studies, the transportation improvement program, and the unified planning work program.   

Transportation Policy Committee

The Transportation Policy Committee (TPC) is the final approval authority for transportation planning documents.  Membership includes representatives from the City of Lawton, Lawton Metropolitan Planning Organization, Lawton-Fort Sill Regional Airport, Comanche County Board of Commissioners, state legislators, Oklahoma Department of Transportation Federal Highway Administration, Federal Transit Administration, Fort Sill, Lawton-Fort Sill Chamber of Commerce and Industry, and the local bicycle organization. 

Approval Process

The public involvement process for the 2035 Long Range Transportation Plan extension included the following major activities: 

ü      A public meeting was held in December 2012 seeking public input on the draft plan.

ü      A public review and comment period was opened from November 29, 2012 to January 10, 2013.

ü      Copies of the proposed plan were distributed per the adopted Public Participation Process of the LMPO.

ü      The draft plan was posted on the LMPO’s website (www.lawtonmpo.org).

ü      The LMPO held a public hearing on January 10, 2013.

ü      The TTC and the TPC held public meetings to review and adopt the plan.

 

CHAPTER 2:  2030 LRTP Data vs. Current Data

Population and Employment

Since the adoption of the 2030 LRTP in January 2008, there has been very little change in population and employment data.  The 2030 LRTP included projections based on the Regional Economic Models, Inc., (REMI) Simulation Group’s analysis of the Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) data.  The REMI model projected the LMA 2030 population to be 154,627, and the Oklahoma Department of Commerce projected the 2030 population to be 139,200.  The movement of military personnel occurred between 2008 and 2010.  The population and employment were projected to increase 35% by 2030.  As illustrated in the tables below, the actual effect of BRAC was not as significant as anticipated, and the actual growth in population and employment did not meet projections.  In fact, the 2035 population projection for the LMA is now less than the 2030 projection of 139,200 by the Oklahoma Department of Commerce.   

Table 1. Comparison of Population Data

 

CENSUS

2000

2030 PROJECTION

CENSUS 2010

2035 PROJECTION

CHANGE IN POPULATION 2000-2010

CHANGE IN PROJECTION 2030-2035

Comanche County

114,996

154,627

124,098

133,954

9,102

-13.37%

Lawton (1)

92,757

130,000

96,867

107,597

 (2)

4,110

-17.23%

Source: 2010 Census and Oklahoma Department of Commerce

NOTE:  Study area is approximately the same as the Lawton City Limits excluding Fort Sill.

            2030 Projections included REMI projection based on Fort Sill population increase of 10,445.

(1)  Includes Lawton and Fort Sill population.

(2)  Based on rate of growth from 2000 to 2010. 

Lawton did not experience the projected growth in population due to BRAC and the following table indicates employment at Fort Sill declined by more than 2,400 jobs from 2000 to 2010; however, overall employment increased.   

Table 2: Comparison of Employment Data

 

CENSUS 2000

CENSUS 2010

CHANGE 2000-2010

2030 FORECAST

Comanche County

56,461

61,260

4,799

 

Lawton

45,807

48,697

2,890

 

Armed Forces

12,390

9,972

-2,418

 

Lawton without Fort Sill

33,417

38,725

5,308

47,000

Source: US Census Bureau

NOTE:  The 2030 Forecast was prepared by Art Pendergraft, Transportation Modeling Consultant for the 2030 LRTP 

Growth Patterns

The population and employment forecasts used in the development of the 2030 LRTP indicated the fastest growth within the study area to occur south of Lee Boulevard and west of SW 38th Street.  This is the area that has experienced the most growth.   

Street Improvements

The study area consists of a network of highways and streets, ranging from local streets serving the needs of a neighborhood to multi-lane highways serving regional and national trip purposes. There have been improvements made to the transportation network since 2008:   

  • Reconstruction of NW 38th Street between NW Cache Road and West Gore Boulevard from a four-lane arterial to a five-lane arterial.
  • Reconstruction of NW Sheridan Road and US 62 interchange.
  • Reconstruction of NW Fort Sill Boulevard and US 62 interchange.
  • Reconstruction of NW 67th Street between US 62 and NW Cache Road.
  • Reconstruction of Interstate 44 within the LMA. 

Chapter 3: Transportation System 

In addition to the street improvements listed in Chapter 2, in 2011 the City of Lawton adopted a Complete Streets Policy that commits the City to the following:

 

  1. Any roadway within the City of Lawton which is to be newly constructed or completely reconstructed should be designed to provide for the safety and convenience of all users of all ages and of all abilities, including pedestrians, bicyclists, transit users, and motorists, both along roadway corridor and also crossing the corridor. 
  2. Any project in which an existing roadway surface is to be restored or rehabilitated and any remediation of deficient or non-existent sidewalks should be reviewed for the potential to improve the roadway to the level of a “complete street”.  Such consideration shall particularly include a determination of whether the additional work needed to produce a “complete street” is reasonable in relation to the scope of the proposed roadway maintenance or improvement. 
  3. Any new subdivision within the City of Lawton that is adjacent to an arterial or section-line road should provide adequate right-of-way for said roadway to accommodate the ultimate and complete cross-section, including vehicular travel lanes, bicycle lanes, sidewalks, and transit requirements. 
  4. Any improvements prescribed by this policy should be consistent with the functional classification of each roadway as indicated within the Lawton Metropolitan Area Long Range Transportation Plan and any appendices thereto. 
  5. Any exception to applying this Complete Streets Policy to a specific roadway project should be approved by the City Council using criteria developed for such purpose and with documentation with the reason for the exception. 
  6. An annual report will be made to the City Council by the City staff showing progress made in implementing this policy.  

This policy is being adhered to in the design of the two street projects currently underway:  SW 52nd Street and SE 45th Street.

The data used to model the transportation network for the 2030 LRTP is still valid for the update of the plan.  The traffic counts performed in 2011 indicated no significant increase in traffic.  The current traffic counts are available on the LMPO’s website www.lawtonmpo.org.  The recommended network is not changed from the 2030 LRTP.  The system is projected to have 11.68 miles of streets at LOS “D” by 2035 as illustrated in Map 6. 

Road System

The Lawton Metropolitan Area is served by Interstate 44, State Highway 7 and US Highway 62.  

  • Interstate 44 is the major north-south transportation corridor.
  • State Highway 7 extends from its interchange with I-44 east. This facility is access controlled by ODOT.
  • U. S. Highway 62 extends from its interchange with I-44 west on Rogers Lane and is a limited access freeway.  

The local network consists of more than 700 miles of roads. The City maintains the roads within the  corporate limits excluding the Interstate system, U.S. or State Highways, which are maintained byODOT. The County maintains the roads outside the City’s corporate limits. 

Public Transportation

The Lawton Area Transit System (LATS) is the fixed route transit and complementary paratransit services available to this community.  LATS began mass transit services in 2002.   The system provides service to Ft. Sill, major shopping areas, medical facilities, Cameron University, and a number of Lawton Public Schools including all middle schools and high schools. LATS operates Monday - Friday, 6 a.m. to 7 p.m., and Saturday, 9:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m.  LATS provides a fixed routes system including five fixed routes with a total of 10 buses running on a pulse - clockwise/counter clockwise pattern and covers approximately 50 miles of the street system.  The routes are shown on Map 2.  All routes run through the Downtown Transfer Center, currently located on the north side of the 400 block of “B” Avenue.  LATS makes flag stops for passengers along the Fixed Routes. Bus passes, transfers or correct fares are collected in the fare box. Reduced fares are available for: Medicare patients, elderly, and students.  On air action days adult full fares are reduced to $0.50. 

The fixed route fleet consists of 7 Gillig and 10 Aero Access low floor buses. These vehicles are equipped with a factory-installed accessible ramp allowing both ambulatory passengers and passengers with mobility devices to board and alight the buses without the need for negotiating steps on the bus. The process of replacing and upgrading the fleet began in 2010 with 7 new buses being acquired.  The paratransit system began with one 30-foot low floor vehicle, and now includes an additional three new paratransit buses.  

During the summer of 2012 a feasibility study was prepared to gauge the need for and potential usage of public transit service to the West Lawton Industrial Park.  The study provided stakeholders with an estimation of the need of service and the most cost effective options to address that need.  Transit service to the Industrial Park could produce other benefits to the community including, but not limited to, congestion mitigation, reduction in the amount of wear on roadways, and reduction in automotive emissions.  The LMPO recommended the City approve a Flexible Fixed Route which would operate along most of the major arterials Monday through Saturday with arrival and departure times corresponding to shift changes for the largest number of employees.  It was also recommended that a Carpool/Vanpool program be approved to provide another option at a low cost. 

Bicycle & Pedestrian Facilities

In June 2008 the City adopted the Lawton Metropolitan Bicycle and Pedestrian Plan.  An amendment to the plan was approved in 2010 for the location of the Elmer Thomas Park Connector.  The design of the first nine routes is nearly complete, and it is anticipated construction of the routes will begin in the Spring of 2013.  Funding has been provided through Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality funds, ODOT Transportation Enhancement grants, the Comanche Nation, and the City of Lawton.  Map 3 illustrates the routes approved in the Bicycle and Pedestrian Plan. 

Safe Routes to School

In 2011 the Elementary School Accessibility/Walkability Report was approved.  This report studied the current state of infrastructure and transportation resources available to the elementary schools in the LMATS area.  The report is to be used as a reference when applying for Federal funding such as Safe Routes to School (SRTS) or other programs that target strategies for building healthier communities.  The report prioritized schools needing improvements, and Pat Henry Elementary School was first on the list.  In 2011 the City used information from this report when submitting the SRTS application for Pat Henry Elementary School.    

Airport

The Lawton-Fort Sill Regional Airport is centrally located within the study area and operates as an intermodal (Ground/Air) facility for the area’s freight. Facilities and infrastructure exist to serve truck- to-plane transfers of freight and vice-versa. According to the Federal Aviation Administration the airport is classified as a Commercial Airport because it exceeds 2,500 passengers per year. The Airport has one major carrier. The current Airport Master Plan was adopted in July 2008. 

Railroad

Freight movement by rail in the study area is primarily used by the industries in the west industrial park. There are approximately 13.75 miles of open rail track in the region. The rail infrastructure is the responsibility of the Stillwater Central Railroad.  There is no passenger rail service in the study area. 

Freight

The need for a freight route has been discussed for many years.  Previous LRTPs discussed constructing 97th Street from US 62 south to NW Cache Road, extending the route along 97th Street to Lee Boulevard, east on Lee Boulevard to 82nd Street, and then south on 82nd Street to SH 36.  This route would provide a loop around Lawton from I-44.  The ODOT Division VII Engineer has advised that 97th Street is too close to the interchange of NW Quanah Parker Trailway and Rogers Lane (US 62).  Further study will be required before a freight route can be recommended.   

Environment

The study area has many of the same environmental concerns as other similarly-sized metropolitan areas. The City’s land development and transportation policies that impact environmental issues will be addressed prior to any future development.  

Air Quality

The LMPO, working with the Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality (ODEQ), ensures that the metropolitan transportation system contributes to improving air quality.  In 2008 EPA changed the ozone threshold to 0.075 ppm to be designated as an “attainment area.”  Currently Comanche County is designated as an attainment area.   

The ODEQ did operate two air quality-monitoring stations for Lawton; however, in 2010 the station located on SW 11th Street at Baseline Road was closed.  The remaining station is located in the north-central part of the city. This station continuously samples the air for Comanche County for ground level ozone. Data gathered at this station is used by the EPA and ODEQ to report on air quality in the LMA. Table 3 shows the 2012 8-hour average for ground-level ozone readings taken at sites throughout Oklahoma. Lawton has exceeded the NAAQS; however, the average fourth highest reading from 2010 – 2012 is 0.075 which is at the threshold to be designated as attainment. The ODEQ monitors weather conditions and informs the City of Lawton Planning Division of air action days.  It should be noted that air action days were not forecasted on any of the days in which the ozone level exceeded 0.075 in 2012. 

The trend of ground-level ozone transport from Dallas-Fort Worth through Oklahoma is expected to continue, considering that prevailing winds during the ground-level ozone season are predominantly from the south. The transport of pollution by prevailing wind patterns is one factor that is out of the control of the LMA.  

The LMPO must focus on the parts of the problem within our control. On air action days, the community is urged to do their part to reduce emissions for the day. The Clean Air Lawton program encourages citizens to take personal responsibility for reducing air pollution and helping our area avoid expensive penalties and economic development consequences for violating federal air quality standards.  

Table 3: 2012 Highest 8 Hour Averages Through November 1, 2012

Site

09 4th       10 4th          11 4th

1st (date)

2nd (date)

3rd (date)

4th (date)

09-11 Avg* 4th Highs

10-12 Avg* 4th Highs

Walters (680)

0.086

0.085

0.085

0.082

 

 

Closed

closed

0.083

27-Jun

8-Aug

9-Aug

12-Aug

 

 

Healdton (297)

0.084

0.082

0.081

0.078

 

 

Closed

closed

0.085

9-Aug

17-May

28-Jun

11-Sep

 

 

Tulsa West (144)

0.089

0.086

0.085

0.083

0.075

0.078

0.074

0.069

0.083

6-Aug

1-Aug

12-Jul

21-Jul

 

 

Tulsa East (178)

0.106

0.084

0.082

0.082

0.075

0.078

0.072

0.071

0.082

25-Jun

6-Aug

16-May

2-Aug

 

 

Tulsa Central (1127)

0.101

0.093

0.085

0.085

0.075

0.080

0.072

0.070

0.085

1-Aug

16-May

27-Jul

2-Aug

 

 

Tulsa North (137)

0.092

0.091

0.089

0.084

0.077

0.080

0.073

0.073

0.085

1-Aug

26-Jun

7-Aug

2-Aug

 

 

Tulsa South (174)

0.088

0.085

0.085

0.083

0.072

0.077

0.067

0.069

0.080

6-Aug

20-Jul

1-Aug

7-Aug

 

 

OKC North (1037)

0.089

0.087

0.084

0.081

0.077

0.079

0.076

0.072

0.084

25-Jun

6-Aug

26-Jun

12-Aug

 

 

OKC Central (033)

0.088

0.082

0.081

0.079

0.075

0.077

0.074

0.071

0.082

6-Aug

1-Sep

12-Aug

8-Aug

 

 

OKC Moore (049)

0.088

0.084

0.082

0.080

0.073

0.077

0.069

0.070

0.081

8-Aug

6-Aug

12-Aug

9-Jul

 

 

OKC Goldsby (1073)

0.091

0.082

0.081

0.076

0.073

0.075

0.070

0.069

0.080

8-Aug

9-Aug

12-Aug

18-May

 

 

OKC Choctaw (096)

0.087

0.083

0.082

0.080

0.075

0.077

0.074

0.070

0.081

8-Aug

12-Aug

1-Aug

6-Aug

 

 

OKC Yukon (101)

0.077

0.076

0.075

0.075

0.075

0.076

0.071

0.072

0.083

12-Aug

6-Aug

28-Jun

11-Jul

 

 

Lawton North (651)

0.086

0.084

0.081

0.080

0.072

0.075

0.070

0.067

0.079

8-Aug

27-Jun

9-Aug

12-Aug

 

 

McAlester (415)

0.084

0.080

0.077

0.076

0.071

0.074

0.067

0.068

0.078

9-Aug

8-Aug

6-Aug

28-Jun

 

 

Seiling (860)

0.081

0.078

0.076

0.076

0.070

0.073

0.067

0.067

0.078

21-Aug

27-Jun

12-Jul

3-Aug

 

 

*0.076 or greater indicates exceedance of National Ambient Air Quality Standards

Source: ODEQ


CHAPTER 4:  GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

This chapter outlines the plan’s goals and objectives which are a continuation of the 2030 LRTP. The goals of this transportation plan are mobility, multimodalism, livability, safety and security, system management, coordination, land use planning, and environmental impacts.  

Goal One: Access and Mobility

Develop and maintain a multi-modal transportation system that provides for the effective movement of people and goods. 

Objectives:

A.        Establish standards for the connection of streets, pedestrian and bicycle facilities within   individual subdivisions of land, between adjacent land areas, in relation to existing and      planned facilities, that allows for efficient movement of vehicles, pedestrians and goods and      services.

B.         Create context-based options for street designs that support multiple users and                          multiple modes of transportation within the rights-of-way, and through which the                            design of streets may transition along their length to better support anticipated and                         adjacent land uses.

C.        Identify freight routes that provide direct connections to the interstate system.

D.        Designate hazardous material transport routes.

E.         Design intersections on freight routes to accommodate large vehicles.

F.         Develop a multi-modal transportation system that includes appropriate public transit, bicycle,     and pedestrian facilities.

G.        Require connectivity (automobile, pedestrian and bicycle) among new and existing

            developments to promote reduction in trip length.

H.        Design transportation facilities that consider the needs of individuals with disabilities or    restricted mobility.

I.          Develop and maintain a continuous network of attractive public facilities, including multi-use

            trails, bicycle routes, bicycle lanes, and walkways.

J.          Encourage adequate bicycle parking facilities for employees, customers, and visitors at

            businesses, libraries, schools, transit stops, and other public destinations.

 

Goal Two: Livability

Develop and maintain a transportation system that promotes safe, healthy, and attractive

neighborhoods. 

Objectives:

A.        When modifying or rebuilding the road network: beautify streetscapes, restore roadways to a

            human scale, and improve the character and livability of the area through which they pass.

B.         Set up traffic-calming measures, where appropriate, with special attention to safety needs to       control vehicle movements and speeds on neighborhood streets when supported by      local residents.

C.        Employ road design guidelines that encourage compliance with posted speed limits and support a walkable community design.

D.        Develop visual and sound barriers between roads classified as arterials and homes.

E.         Enable bicycle and pedestrian circulation within and between neighborhoods.

F.         Develop design guidelines for streetscapes, including landscaping, street trees, pedestrian-          scale lighting, transit stops, curbing, and other elements of the streetscape. 

Goal Three: Safety and Security

Develop and maintain a safe and secure transportation system. 

Objectives:

A.        Rank safety and security in the achievement of every goal for both motorized and non-   motorized modes of transportation.

B.         Increase the number of interconnections within the transportation network to provide multiple

            possible routes for emergencies. For example, a home on a road that intersects two other          roads offers two exits, while a dead-end offers only one.

C.        Regularly monitor motor vehicle accidents to analyze high accident locations and develop

            mitigation measures. Consider existing safety-related problems—such as speeding, following

            too close, failure to yield, stop sign noncompliance, etc.

D.        Identify appropriate mitigation techniques to reduce the number and severity of accidents.

E.         Promote safe frontage access by limiting curb cuts onto collectors and arterials.

F.         Where possible, physically separate bicycle and pedestrian paths from roads carrying large volumes of traffic.

G.        Evaluate alternatives to reduce traffic delays associated with signalized intersections and             stop-controlled intersections.

H.        Identify priority corridors where access management techniques can be carried out to    improve traffic flow and have positive safety benefits.

I.          Encourage the Lawton Area Transit System (LATS) to incorporate safety and security measures into the operating system.

J.          Develop street crossings to be safe, attractive and easy to navigate.

K.        Improve traffic safety through engineering, education and enforcement. 

Goal Four: Transportation System Management.

Preserve and maintain the transportation system.

 Objectives:

A.        Regularly evaluate the condition of the transportation network to allocate the City’s and             County’s resources efficiently.

B.         Preserve current and planned right-of-way for the transportation system.

C.        Provide sufficient roadway capacity to maintain a Level of Service of D on streets and at

            intersections.

D.        Identify and preserve right-of-way, including abandoned rail lines, for future bicycle and multi     use trails.

Goal Five: Growth and Development

Ensure that future development minimizes adverse impacts on the current and future

transportation system by promoting development patterns that reduce the need of automobiles and

encourages the use of alternate modes of transportation. 

Objectives:

A.        Consider and mitigate the impact of development on the transportation network.

B.         Ensure transportation decisions are consistent with and support the goals of the Land Use          Plan.

C.        Plan and design future transportation facilities to be physically and aesthetically compatible         with the character of the SA.

D.        Relate the scale and concentration of development to what can be supported by the

            transportation system.

E.         Promote connectivity by developing an interconnected network of low-speed and low-volume

            streets.

F.         Direct development toward areas already served by multiple modes of transportation or             where such facilities can be provided. 

Goal Six: Environment

Protect the environment and the significant natural, agricultural, scenic, and historic resources. 

Objectives:

A.        Reduce transportation impacts on water quality, wetlands, and wildlife habitats.

B.         Reduce dependency on single-occupancy vehicles by supporting transit and car pool/

            vanpool/rideshare initiatives and working to make bicycle and pedestrian travel an attractive

            alternative to motor vehicles.

C.        Reduce adverse noise impacts related to the transportation system.

D.        Evaluate potential impacts of transportation on environmentally sensitive areas, parks and

            recreational facilities, and historical and archaeological sites.

E.         Discourage disruption to cohesive neighborhoods.

F.         Preserve adequate right-of-way for future transportation infrastructure to reduce the negative

            impacts, including potential displacement to area residents and businesses.

G.        Protect neighborhoods from excessive through traffic and travel speeds.

H.        Maintain an open transportation planning process that encourages involvement and         participation from all communities, businesses, individuals and stakeholders.

I.          Incorporate Federal Environmental Justice principles into planning activities to ensure     maximum representation for traditionally under-represented and minority populations.

J.          Provide a cost-effective transportation system where the public and development industry pay

            respective share of the system’s costs proportional to their demands on the system.

 

CHAPTER 5:  PROJECTS 

The list of projects is updated by deleting projects which have been completed since the 2030 LRTP was adopted, to reflect changes in timeframes due to the 2012 Capital Improvements Program, and to add projects listed in the ODOT 8-Year Construction Plan.  The changes are as follows: 

  • SE 45th Street (Lee Boulevard to Arlington Avenue) - moved to 2011-2015 from 2016-2020
  • I-44/US 62 Interchange – added to 2011-2015
  • SW 52nd Street (Gore Boulevard to railroad tracks) - project split into two phases with second phase (railroad tracks to Lee Boulevard) moved to 2016-2020
  • SW 112th Street (Lee to Cache Road) – added to 2011-2015 (work to be done in two phases)
  • NW Cache Road (67th Street to 97th Street) – moved to 2016-2020 from 2011-2015 (work to be done in two phases)
  • SW 52nd Street (Bishop Road to Lee Boulevard) – moved to 2016-2020 from 2011-2015
  • NE Rogers Lane (I-44 to Flower Mound Road) – moved to 2016-2020 from 2021-2025
  • West Gore Boulevard (67th Street – 82nd Street) – moved to 2016-2020 from 2006-2010
  • Lee Boulevard (82nd Street west 6 miles) – moved to 2016-2020 from 2006-2010

Table 4 lists the projects to be programmed for the 20-year horizon, and Map 4 illustrates the locations.  The projects beyond the year 2015 have an inflation factor of 2.5% per year incorporated into the estimated cost. 

 Table 4: Projects

Project Years

Project

Federal Funding

State Funding

Local Funding

Estimated Total Cost

2011-2015

 

 

 

 

 

SE 45th St. (Lee Blvd. – Arlington Avenue)

Reconstruct from 2 lanes to 5 lanes

$6,000,000

$0

$5,504,345

$11,504,345

I-44/US 62 Interchange

Interchange Improvement

$7,780,000

$0

$0

$7,780,000

I-44 Tri-level

Bridge Replacement, Rehabilitation, and Safety Upgrades

$2,665,000

$0

$0

$2,665,000

SW 52nd Street (Gore Blvd. south to railroad tracks)

Reconstruct from 2 lanes to 5 lanes

$0

$0

$9,900,000

$9,900,000

SW 112th Street (Lee Boulevard north to railroad tracks)

Reconstruct to 2 lane Urban Collector

$950,000

$0

$1,750,830

(split between City and County)

$2,700,830

NW 112th Street (railroad tracks north to Cache Road)

Reconstruct to 2 lane Urban Collector

$950,000

$0

$1,453,280

(split between City and County)

$2,403,280

Bicycle / Pedestrian Facilities

Design, Construction, Education

$2,980,380

$0

$745,095

$3,725,475

Intersection Modification / Signalization

Design, Construction

$1,246,875

$0

$311,719

$1,558,594

Maintenance

 

$4,265,625

$6,999,563

$13,125,000

$24,390,188

Transit

 

$10,284,238

$530,000

$6,415,273

$17,229,511

Enhancement

 

$1,050,000

$0

$262,500

$1,312,500

 

Total

2011-2015

$38,172,118

$7,529,563

$39,468,042

$85,169,723

2016-2020

 

 

 

 

 

Cache Rd. (82nd – 97th )

Reconstruct from 2 lanes to 5 lanes

$4,725,000

$0

$1,181,250

$5,906,250

Cache Rd. (67th – 82nd )

Reconstruct from 4 lanes to 5 lanes

 

Lawton Metropolitan
Planning Organization

212 Southwest 9th Street
Lawton, OK 73501
Phone: 580-581-3375